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in luv with fish from black jesus doe

- ? Sep 18th 2014

5centsapound:

Carrie Mae Weems: The Kitchen Table Series (1990)

(via sadeshawty)

- ? Sep 14th 2014

akilivumbi:

Thundercat + Eric Andre - “Tron Song” 

(via 5265ad)

- ? Sep 14th 2014
gangsterdoodles:

Gucci Mane - Bitch I Might Be

gangsterdoodles:

Gucci Mane - Bitch I Might Be

asylum-art:

Adolfo Bimer

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Adolfo Bimer (1985) is a Chilean Artist, his most recent work in painting wanders between the discipline of the portrait and a development in new techniques of direct interaction of painting materials, that causes chemical reactions which are used in both metaphorically and visual terms to represent the human body.

(via mayapapaya)

- ? Sep 13th 2014

2headedsnake:

Sara Andreasson

(Source: saraandreasson.se, via cadavreexquise)

- ? Sep 12th 2014
sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

(via sus-dad)

furyouwithlove:

Ana Mendieta

furyouwithlove:

Ana Mendieta

(via plantaplanta)

the production at Marc Jacobs was ridic

the production at Marc Jacobs was ridic


Louise Bourgois, The Couple, 2009

Louise Bourgois, The Couple, 2009

(Source: dionyssos, via khrybaby)

gangsterdoodles:

Schoolboy Q

gangsterdoodles:

Schoolboy Q

photographicpictures:

Gareth Pugh s/s 2015 

(via pyrrhics)

- ? Sep 7th 2014
gravesandghouls:

Halloween, 1984

gravesandghouls:

Halloween, 1984

(via nat7xy)

cubebreaker:

Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck’s surreal collage art juxtaposes vintage photographs with contemporary composition styles to challenge traditional states of mind.

(via pokenosier)

- ? Sep 6th 2014

professionalblender:

MC Ride throwing people off stage

(via thisnoiseismusic)

- ? Sep 4th 2014